Boston Massacre  

 

By Ben D. and Ellie

 

Introduction...............................................................................................................3

What Led Up to the Fight?.........................................................................................4

What Happened?........................................................................................................5

The Effects of The Massacre.......................................................................................6

Who Died and Why Were They Important?...............................................................7   Was The Massacre Really a "Massacre"?....................................................................8

Conclusion...................................................................................................................9

Letter From The Patriot Point of View.......................................................................10

Letter From The Loyalist Point of View......................................................................11

Index...........................................................................................................................12

Glossary.................................................................................................................13-14

 

 

 

 

 

       Introduction

The Boston Massacre is an important event in the American Revolution. After the first shot was fired, there was total chaos and the beginning of an unforgettable massacre. Many people died for American rights and we remember them today. The Boston Massacre took place in Boston, Massachusetts in front of the Old State House on March 5, 1770.  

British Soldiers were patrolling the streets of Boston and a mob of colonists found them. They started calling the British Soldiers names such as ¨Redcoats¨ or ¨Lobsterbacks¨ and threw pieces of ice and snow at them. One of the colonists hit Private Hugh Montgomery. Nobody knows for a fact what happened after that. Maybe Montgomery fell but what people know for sure is that he was the first one to fire. That was in fact what began the event.

 

What Led Up to the Fight? 

What Happened?

 

The first of thing that happened was the British loaded their guns. Then they all fired in confusion after the first shot was fired, thinking they were supposed to. They predicted that they were ordered to fire and just did not hear the command. The colonists did not think that the British were going to fire because the British were not supposed to fire unless the local government told them to. The soldier would be hanged if the local government did not tell them to fire and fired. The only weapon that the colonists had were pieces of snow and ice so, they were not very protected. Three colonists were left on the ground dead; two others died later of serious injuries, and six others were wounded.                  

 

   The effects of this occurrence was an utter disaster, Many people ended up fleeing boston completely. Hutchinson started to investigate the event, and by morning, Preston and the 8 soldiers were off to jail. Preston’s trial lasted October, 24, 1770 to October, 30 1770. John Adams, who went on to become the second U.S. president, defended the soldiers in court. Conflicts between the British and the colonists had been on rise because the British government was trying to increase control over the colonies and raise taxes at the same time. The event in Boston helped bring together the colonies against the British.

 

 The Effects Of The Massacre

Who Died And Why Were they Important?

Many people died in the Boston Massacre. The colonists who died were, Crispus Attucks, Samuel Gray and James Caldwell. Samuel Maverick died a few hours later and Patrick Carr died nine days later. Six people were left with both minor and major injuries. The people that died were important because they were some of the first people to lose their lives for American cause. Crispus Attucks was the first one to die. He was African American and a former slave. There is a monument for him in Boston.

Was The Massacre Really A "Massacre?"

 

The answer to that question is no. Paul Revere was extremely angered at the thought of British Soldiers firing at the Patriots. He engraved a picture of  British Soldiers firing at surrendering Patriots. He also made sure that the British had wide smiles on their faces as they fired and that the patriots were not fighting back. The event then, got its name, “The Boston Massacre”. People thought that the engraving actually was based off of what happened so they started freaking out.

 

 

Conclusion

In conclusion, The Boston Massacre was an important event even with it’s ups and downs. People may have died, but we remember them for their bravery and determination that won freedom of the United States. 

 







     March 6, 1770

 

Dear Isabelle,

    There have been horrible events due to the Revolution. Late last night, when the other Patriots and I were complaining about the unfair taxes those dirty Lobsterbacks  fired upon us off command!  Now, don’t be worried. for I am fine. I was very lucky, I am very sorry to say that we have lost five of our strong brothers. I came out of the fight with a few scratches and bruises, but I am fine besides that. I miss you very much, how are the children? Please tell me what is going on at home, for I am missing you and the children very much.

 

             All My Love,

                                  Harold

Letter From Patriot Point of View

 

 

Letter from Loyalist Point of View  

March 7, 1770

 

   Dear Mother and Father,

 

Those darn rebels! When I was patrolling the streets of Boston  with my fellow soldiers, a drunken mob of them started attacking us! They were calling us “Redcoats” and “Lobster Backs.” They even threw large pieces of ice and snow at us! Private Hugh Montgomery was the first to fire, but I don’t blame him! One of those rebels hit him with a piece of ice. I’m not quite sure what happened after that. Maybe he fell? But that is besides the point. After that, we started shooting to defend ourselves. I do not regret firing as we were doing nothing wrong! Now eight of us are in jail!  Don’t worry!  I was lucky and I was not sent to jail. I will never let our king down!

 

       Your beloved son,

                                     Rubert Callwiggin

 

Crispus Attucks, 7

James Caldwell, 7 

Patrick Carr, 7

Samuel Gray, 7 

Samuel Maverick, 7 

 

 

Index 

American Revolution- the war between Great Britain and its American colonies, 1775–83, by which the colonies won their independence.

 

Conflicts- to come into collision or disagreement; be contradictory, at variance, or in opposition; clash:

 

Defended- to swat off attack from; guard against assault or injury (usually followed by from or against)

 

Determination- the act of coming to a decision or of fixing or settling a purpose.

 

Engraved- to have carved text or a design into an object such as stone.

 

Fleeing- to be retreating or aborting your current mission.

 

Hanged- to be hung by your neck and choked to death by a special kind of rope.

 

Local Government- the governing body of a town or district.

 

 

Glossary

Massacre-  The unnecessary, indiscriminate killing of a large number of human beings or animals, as in barbarous warfare or persecution or for revenge or plunder

 

Monument- Something erected in memory of a person, event, etc., as a building, pillar, or statue

 

Occurrence- Something that happens; event; incident

 

Patrolling-  (of a police officer, soldier, etc.) To pass along a road, beat, etc., or around or through a specified area in order to maintain order and security.

 

Predicted- To declare or tell in advance; prophesy; foretell:

 

"Redcoats" or "Lobsterbacks"- Names that colonists called British Soldiers to make fun of them.

 

Taxes- a sum of money demanded by a government for its support or for specific facilities or services, levied upon incomes, property, sales, etc.

Glossary

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Trial-  The examination before a judicial tribunal of the facts put in issue in a cause, often including issues of law as well as those of fact.

Glossary

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