BLACK FOOTED                    FERRET

Introduction

In this book you will learn about the black footed ferret. I will be talking about where they live, what their predators are and early life. I chose this topic because l had no clue what this animal was and I wanted to learn more about it. This topic interested me because it's different than other animalsand it's out of the ordinary.





I dedicate this book to all the people that are helping to get the black footed ferrets back into the wild.  

 

Baby black footed ferret playing 

Chapter 1----------------------------------------------------------------- pge.4

Chapter 2----------------------------------------------------------------- pge. 7

Chapter 3----------------------------------------------------------------- pge. 12

Glossray------------------------------------------------------------------ pge. 21

Bibliography------------------------------------------------------------ pge. 22

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

A baby black footed ferret climbs up the wall

A baby black footed ferret tries to climb up the wall 

Chapter 1 Early life

 

“There are 500 of these animals left in the wild” says prairiewildlife.org/. These small, furry quick witted animals have a black face mask and black on the tip of its tale (1). The black footed ferret is a very interesting animal that many people would not know about.  Here are three facts about their life. One is their life as a baby two the early life finally the adult life.



Baby black footed ferrets are very cute as babies or kits. Once they are born they are blind and helpless. “ The kits are born blind and helpless until two months old” say defenders.org. This means that if they are attack by predators they will most not likely survive because they can not see. The kits stay underground for two months. “ staying below ground until they are about two months old” clams fws.gov. This means that when they are old enough they will go out and learn how to hunt with their mother. The babies are born with white fur and the average length is 2-3 feet. According to animalsspot.net it said “ that the infants are born with white fur. This means that when they are born they do not look like the adult ferrets they start to look like them at at about three months old.

 

4

As they babys grow up they look different and they are more free. At two months old the baby ferrets move out of their home and move away. “ The mother takes care of the babies until they learn how to to come out of their burrows” says animalspot.com. This means that when the young ferrets start coming out of the burrows the mother will set them free to go out on their own and make a new burrow to live in. At 90 days the kits are almost adults.  “ At approximately 90 days of age, kits reach 90% of their adult size, and are adept at killing prairie dogs” says fws.gov. This means that they are almost adults and are out hunting by themselves. The babies are born in the early summer and by fall they are fully grown. “By the fall the ferrets are completely independent and will disperse to their own territories” says defenders.org. This means that they will no longer be with their mothers or the rest of it's family.

 

 

 

Once the babies are fully grown they need to be even more independent and responsible. The black footed ferret averages to be from 18 to 24 inches long. “ The black footed ferret is 18-24 inches and their tale is 5-6 inches long” say defenders.org. Also they don’t weigh that much, they weigh 1.5 to 2.5 pounds. “The adult black footed ferret weighs from 1.5 to 2.5 but the male weighs slightly larger than the female” (1).  The black footed ferret spends most of its life underground. “They spend 90% of their life underground” say animalspot.com.

 

The black footed ferret is a very interesting animal that many people would not know about in the world. Life as a baby,early life and the adult life. The black footed ferret is in need because there are only a couple hundred of the species left.

 

Chapter 2               

Where do black footed ferrets live?

7

“The black-footed ferret often makes it's home out of abandoned prairie dogs burrows,” say nhptv.org.  “ The black-footed ferret is found in short or middle grass prairies(1). The black-footed ferret can not dig, so they take over prairie dog homes. The burrow, where they live in the wild, and why prairie dogs are so important to their burrows.

 

The burrow is where the black-footed ferret spends most of their time. The black-footed ferrets does mostly everything in their burrow. “The black-footed ferret inhabits temporary grasslands where they eat prairie dogs, sleep and raise their young,” says toronto.com. The burrows are 15 feet deep and 60 feet long. “Prairie dog burrows can be from 15 feet deep and 60 feet long,” says prairiewildlife.org. “Sometimes the burrows can connect with other burrows” (1).

 

Where do Black-footed ferrets live? The black-footed ferrets live in the great plans of eight states. “ black-footed ferrets live on the great planes of Arizona, Colorado, Kansas, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, North Dakota and South Dakota” says prairiewildlife.org. They also live in Canada and Mexico. “ They live in a portion of Mexico and Canada” (1). They live in short or middle grasslands. “The Black-footed Ferret is found in short or middle grass prairies. “These carnivores inhabit the short or middle prairie grasslands and are mostly common in the regions wherever its prey prairie dogs are located,” says animalspot.com.

 

 The prairie dogs are critical to the ferrets habitats. The Black-footed ferrets depend on” prairie dog towns to live in. “Black-footed ferrets depend exclusively on prairie dog burrows for shelter,” says fws.org. They live in old abandoned prairie dog towns. “It often makes its homes in abandoned prairie dog burrows,” says nphtv.org. They live where there are a lot of prairie dogs around. “They are  mostly prevalent in the regions wherever its prey prairie dogs are located,” says animalspot.net

 

   The black-footed ferret can not dig, so they take over prairie dog homes. The burrow, where they live and why prairie dogs are so important. They black-footed ferret has a pretty comfortable living for an animal.



Chapter 3 

what are the black footed ferrets predators

12

“In 1987 there were only 18 black-footed ferrets left” says prairiewildlife.org.The black footed ferret is one of the most endangered animals in North America. The black footed ferret is being hunt not only by predators. Humans are cropping over the prairie dog towns, the black footed ferret as many predators, and grasslands and plague are affecting both the prairie dogs and ferrets.

 

Humans are taking the land that the prairie dog towns used to live in they are also killing prairie dogs. Prairie dogs are losing their land. “Habitat loss and non-native disease threaten the recovery of the black-footed ferret”clames worldwildlife.org.Farmers didn’t want prairie dogs on there land so they just farmed over the prairie dog towns. In the 1900’s humans had kill of most of the prairie dogs because they thought that they were competing with the cattle for grass to eat. “1900's humans have eradicated prairie dogs and destroyed prairie dog habitat” says prairiewildlife.org. Farmers wanted the cattle to have all the grass to eat and the prairie dogs were eating it two so they started to kill the prairie dogs. Prairie dog towns are being croped over to farm. “Also, many prairie dog towns have been plowed over for crop fields or destroyed for human development” (1).  Prairie dog towns are croped over so the farmers can farm

The black footed ferrets has many predators. One of the black footed ferrets predators is the golden eagle. “The primary predators of the black-footed ferrets are the golden eagles” says animalspot.net. Eagles hunt for the ferrets to eat. Golden Eagles are the only ones that eat ferrets, American badgers and bobcats also eat black footed ferrets. “American badgers and  bobcats both eat black footed ferrets” (1). They are both predicates of the black footed ferret. Black footed ferrets is also on the dinner menu for the prairie rattlesnake. “Prairie rattlesnakes are among the animals that eat black footed ferret” (1). Rattlesnakes are one of the primary predators of the black footed ferret.

 

Black footed ferrets are not only in danger because of predators they are also in trouble because there is not much grassland left and they are getting infected by plague. Black footed ferrets live in grassy areas but there is not much of these areas left in North America. “Much of the original grassland habitat in North America has been plowed, and very little of these grasslands are protected even today” says defenders.org. There is not much land for the prairie dogs or the black footed ferrets to live in. The sylvatic plague is making black footed ferrets sick. “Non-native disease threaten the recovery of the black-footed ferret” says worldwildlife.org. Prairie dogs are getting sick cause of plague. “Sylvatic plague – an exotic disease to which prairie dogs have no known immunity” says defenders.org. This means that number of prairie dogs are dropping and there the food supply is low.

 

“In 1987 there were only 18 black-footed ferrets left” says prairiewildlife.org. Humans are cropping over where the ferret lives, black footed ferret has many predators and little grassland and non-native deise are killing the prairie dogs. As you can see the black footed ferret is being hunted= not only by predators.

 

Glossary

 

 

 

http://www.dictionary.com/

 

Abandoned-forsaken or deserted

Approximately- near or approaching a certain state, condition, goal, or standard

Average- regular

Burrow- a hole or tunnel in the ground made by a rabbit, fox, or similar animal for habitation and refuge

endangered- threatened with a danger

eradicated-to remove or destroy utterly extirpate

Independent- thinking or acting for oneself

Interesting- engaging or exciting

Portion- a part of any whole,

Territories-any tract of land; region or district

Quick Witted- being agile, alert mined

Development- the act or process of developing growth progress

Primary- first or highest in rank or importance

Infected-to affect or contaminate

Exotic- of foreign origin or character





21

 
Image Bibliography 
 
 
 
 
 
“12757929074_bbf14f2c1a_b.Jpg (1024×768).” Web. 10 Mar. 2016.
“Animals-1144845_960_720.Jpg (960×638).” Web. 10 Mar. 2016.
“Calero_Creek_Trail_Bobcat.Jpg (719×407).” Web. 10 Mar. 2016.
“Golden_Eagle_12a_(6027292102).Jpg (5184×2844).” Web. 10 Mar. 2016.
“Happy_Kits!_(7537056436).Jpg (960×768).” Web. 8 Mar. 2016.
“7537056038_1b8ca1e8f1_b.Jpg (960×679).” Web. 8 Mar. 2016.
“7537056218_8a7d698fbd_b.Jpg (960×685).” Web. 8 Mar. 2016.
“Mustela_nigripes_2.Jpg (722×526).” Web. 17 Feb. 2016.
“4857461346_a3f8ab058a_b.Jpg (1024×815).” Web. 8 Mar. 2016.
“Prairie-Dog-988325_960_720.Jpg (960×640).” Web. 10 Mar. 2016.
“Prairie.Dog.600pix.Jpg (600×680).” Web. 10 Mar. 2016.
“Running_black_footed_ferret.Jpg (609×271).” Web. 17 Feb. 2016.
“Taxidea_taxus_(Point_Reyes,_2007).Jpg (2124×1416).” Web. 10 Mar. 2016.